Dominic_11_2013Dominic Boyer, Ph.D.
Founding Director, CENHS
Professor, Department of Anthropology
Dcb2@rice.edu

 

 

 

Dr. Dominic Boyer has done extensive anthropological research on the practice of news journalism in Germany and the United States and has published widely on the relationship between media and knowledge in modern society. In recent research, he has shown how over the past thirty years the rise of new digital information technology combined with the spread of neoliberal policy regimes to profoundly unsettle broadcast-era patterns of newsmaking and news circulation, thus forcing news journalists to reinvent their expertise and authority. In his current work, Boyer examines the contribution of energy systems to modern political culture. He is involved in ongoing collaborative field research with Prof. Cymene Howe on renewable energy development in Southern Mexico, a project that asks through what configuration of alliances carbon energy dependent states will be able to implement important projects of energy transition.

Before joining the faculty at Rice in 2009, Boyer taught at Cornell University and the University of Chicago. He has held visiting fellowships to the EHESS-Paris, to the Goethe Universit├Ąt Frankfurt and to Durham University. Boyer has been the recipient of grants and fellowships from the National Science Foundation, the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Fulbright, the Social Science Research Council, and the Wenner-Gren Foundation. In addition to editing a book series, Expertise: Cultures and Technologies of Knowledge, with Cornell University Press and to leading the editorial collective of the journal Cultural Anthropology, Boyer is author of Spirit and System: Media, Intellectuals and the Dialectic in Modern German Intellectual Culture (Chicago UP 2005), Understanding Media: A Popular Philosophy (Prickly Paradigm 2007) and The Life Informatic: Newsmaking in the Digital Era (Cornell UP 2013). His next book project is provisionally titled, Winds of Desire: Energopolitics in Southern Mexico.