Jeff Kripal’s New Textbook COMPARING RELIGIONS

Posted by on Mar 29, 2014
Jeff Kripal’s New Textbook COMPARING RELIGIONS

Jeffrey J. Kripal’s new textbook Comparing Religions is now available from Wiley-Blackwell. CENHS member and professor of Religious Studies at Rice, Kripal participated in the Mellon-Sawyer Cultures of Energy seminar from which the CENHS emerged. Comparing Religions includes a major chapter on religion and nature entitled “Super Natural: Religion and Nature,” which comes directly out of Kripal’s work with the Cultures of Energy group, including and especially the visits of Bron Taylor and David Haberman.

You can find more information on Kripal’s book here.

Comparing Religions is a next-generation textbook which expertly guides, inspires, and challenges those who wish to think seriously about religious pluralism in the modern world.

  • A unique book teaching the art and practice of comparing religions
  • Draws on a wide range of religious traditions to demonstrate the complexity and power of comparative practices
  • Provides both a history and understanding of comparative practice and a series of thematic chapters showing how responsible practice is done
  • A three part structure provides readers with a map and effective process through which to grasp this challenging but fascinating approach
  • The author is a leading academic, writer, and exponent of comparative practice
  • Contains numerous learning features, including chapter outlines, summaries, toolkits, discussion questions, a glossary, and many images
  • Supported by a companion website (available on publication) at www.wiley.com/go/kripal, which includes information on individual religious traditions, links of other sites, an interview with the author, learning features, and much more

Jeffrey J. Kripal holds the J. Newton Rayzor Chair in Philosophy and Religious Thought at Rice University. He is the author of Comparing Religions (Wiley-Blackwell, 2013); Mutants and Mystics: Science Fiction, Superhero Comics, and the Paranormal (Chicago, 2011); Authors of the Impossible: The Paranormal and the Sacred (Chicago, 2010); Esalen: America and the Religion of No Religion (Chicago, 2007); The Serpent’s Gift: Gnostic Reflections on the Study of Religion (Chicago, 2007); Roads of Excess, Palaces of Wisdom: Eroticism and Reflexivity in the Study of Mysticism (Chicago, 2001); and Kali’s Child: The Mystical and the Erotic in the Life and Teachings of Ramakrishna (Chicago, 1995). He has also co-edited volumes with: Sudhir Kakar, on the history, science, psychology, and analysis of psychical experiences, Seriously Strange: Thinking Anew about Psychical Experiences (Viking, 2012); Wouter Hanegraaff on eroticism and esotericism, Hidden Intercourse: Eros and Sexuality in the History of Western Esotericism (University of Amsterdam Press, 2008); Glenn W. Shuck on the history of Esalen and the American counterculture, On the Edge of the Future: Esalen and the Evolution of American Culture (Indiana, 2005); Rachel Fell McDermott on a popular Hindu goddess, Encountering Kali: In the Margins, at the Center, in the West (California, 2003); G. William Barnard on the ethical critique of mystical traditions, Crossing Boundaries: Essays on the Ethical Status of Mysticism (Seven Bridges, 2002); and T.G. Vaidyanathan of Bangalore, India, on the dialogue between psychoanalysis and Hinduism, Vishnu on Freud’s Desk: A Reader in Psychoanalysis and Hinduism (Oxford, 1999). His present areas of interest include the re-visioning and renewal of the comparative method in the study of religion, the comparative erotics of mystical literature, American countercultural translations of Asian religious traditions, and the history of Western esotericism from ancient Gnosticism to the New Age. He thinks he may be Spider-Man.

1 Comment

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