“Toxic Agents: Poetry, Pollution, and Environmental Racism” (Tues, Sep 5th)

Posted by on Sep 1, 2017
“Toxic Agents: Poetry, Pollution, and Environmental Racism” (Tues, Sep 5th)

HOUSTON LECTURE SERIES: THE HISTORY AND CULTURE OF DISEASE AND HEALING

Inaugural Lecture: “Toxic Agents: Poetry, Pollution, and Environmental Racism” by CENHS Fellow Clint Wilson III
At the Health Museum of Houston (1515 Hermann Dr, Houston, TX 77004)
Tuesday, September 5th, from 5:30–7:00pm

Friends, families, medical students, and medical professionals in Houston: check out this continuing education lecture series offered by UTHealth School of Public Health, in partnership with Rice University’s Humanities Research Center and Houston’s Health Museum. On Tuesday evenings throughout the Fall, from 5:30–7:00pm, the Health Museum will host a talk featuring a subject related to the “Medical Humanities.” These presentations will range in topic, but they will follow this year’s theme of “Poison, Plague, Potions, and Portrayal.” All lectures are free and open to the public.

This season’s inaugural lecture will take place next Tuesday, September 5th at 5:30pm, featuring CENHS Predoctoral Fellow,  His talk is titled “Toxic Agents: Poetry, Pollution, and Environmental Racism.” Surveying three major toxic events from the last 100 years—the use of weaponized gas in World War I, the silicosis poisoning of West Virginia miners in the 1930s, and the legacies of water “purity” made most recently evident during the Flint Water Crisis—this talk will discuss how poetry helped reveal the stakes and status of toxicity throughout the century.

For official description or to register, read more below:

The History and Culture of Disease and Healing seminar series, by UTHealth School of Public Health & Rice University, identifies the overlap between disciplines in health and humanities, and applies lessons in humanities to public health practice in a global and cross-cultural context. Each lecturer will discuss a topic over history or across cultures and then discuss its application to present day health issues or treatment approaches. Attendance to all seminars is not mandatory. General audience is welcome. FREE CME, CNE, CEUs and FREE parking & admission.

Attendees of this seminar series should achieve the following objectives:

  • Create a conceptual framework of the relationship between historical events and contemporary understanding or approaches to disease and healing.
  • Identify the overlap between disciplines in science (health) and humanities, and recognize the contributions of each.
  • Conceptualize from historical lessons the relationship between human behaviors and disease and healing.
  • Relate the cultural/artistic/literary depiction of the body and disease and medicine to the universal need for mankind to acquire and advance knowledge.
  • Apply lessons in humanities to public health practice in a global and cross-cultural context.

To sign up for this free seminar, click HERE.